Winnifred Trainor to George Thomson, September 17, 1917

September 17, 1917, Huntsville, Ontario

Dear Mr. Thomson,

Your letter received this a.m. and would say I had the pleasure of meeting your sister Margaret in Toronto Aug 31 — together with her niece Jessie Harkness and a little boy Charles – and she asked me about the $250.00 Tom loaned J. S. Fraser. I told her all I knew about it and that is at the time, May or June 1915, the loan was made — and in July 1915 Tom bought a new Chestnut canoe, silk tent etc. and went from Canoe Lake on a long trip coming out at South River about Labor Day. Anyway he said just in time to send your brother who was being married a telegram of congratulation. I do not think Tom got his canoe from Hville. Frasers got theirs here. I also heard at the time he was trying to make the raise of a loan in town and was even asked by the agent if I would like to put it up and my reply was no. I did not know until July 1915, that Tom had made it or I would have said no for him not too as the thing was risky. They also were charging him a $ [...] a day for his board when he could have got it anywhere for $4. You see the Frasers were money grabbing as usual but it will all come back to them. It was awful of Shannon Fraser to charge cartage on the casket. When Tom the day he was drowned helped to cadge a boat for Shannon to rent. Never mind they’ll get it yet. As far as Frasers good faith he has none. Mark Robinson the Ranger hates him.

Well Tom said this spring while at our house that he had loaned Fraser $250 for canoes, but that he had got it all back but in little bits though.

Again if I had known, I could have got them all wholesale instead of retail and Tom might have realized $50.00 on the out lay instead of nothing. I suppose Frasers thought he would board on till Fall with them. I did not know the amount until this spring. When we happened to bring up Shan’s financial standing.

About the overcoat I am enclosing a snap with the one he wore this spring. It was a green plaid Mackinaw. He also bought the Mackinaw trousers, socks & shoepacks he has on, here this spring.

I would think the best way would be to have the executor send for all his belongings, saying the estate required them, as Shan will sell the things & keep the money. The things we have can be had next year when we go back. Your sister Margaret may go with me sometime.

Hoping this will be some in formation to you. You could ask Frasers about it, saying you had come upon some correspondence about this transaction.

I am so sorry I burned my letters that I had left after our home was burned. I had this one where he left the Frasers dissatisfied but he did not tell the reason till the Fall 1915. Then again Tom did not care for Martin Blecher.[…]

Mrs. Fraser I think would see you got everything should you request it. I do not think Frasers deserve one thing. Tom no doubt was paying his board well, supplying fish work & etc. His canoes can be easily stored at the Lake. Tom ploughed and planted their garden & ploughed Larry Dixon’s garden too-

If you did not want the things around home you could have them sent to Annan. Anyway so as Shan Fraser could not have them around. I suppose Tom would be greened if he knew all now.

W.T.

(LAC, Tom Thomson Collection, Reference Number: PA-193567)

Annie Winnifred Trainor, known as Winnifred (1884-1962), eldest daughter of Hugh Trainor, a foreman with the Huntsville Lumber Company, summered at Canoe Lake with her family. It was there she met Tom Thomson, probably in 1913.  Some believe that when Thomson died, he and Trainor were engaged to be married.